Economics

Everything you are about to read has been written by current and recently graduated students at the University of Cambridge, to give you honest information about what it’s like to be a student at Cambridge.

Economics at Cambridge has a focus on macro and micro with modules based on the two taught in all three years. The course requires mathematical ability and essay writing skills. In second and third year you can take optional modules. Lectures mainly take place at Sidgwick Site, with some lectures also taking place in Mill Lane. Supervisions can take place in your college, another college or in the faculty building which is based at Sidgwick.

Economics Credit: Cambridge University

What about the Economics course at Cambridge appealed to you?

Alex, Economics, Jesus College, 1st year
Alex
Jesus College, 1st year

There are many aspects which appealed to me but the main one was the quality of the lecturers. Many of the lecturers engage in research at the cutting edge of economics and it always feels like I learn that little bit extra from those lecturers.

How have you found the structure of the course?

Sian, Economics, Queens College, 1st year
Sian
Queens College, 1st year

The course is quite broad in the first year with a wide overview of macro and micro, as well as statistical techniques. The compulsory economic history and politics module give a good background knowledge and some applications of the theory.

What is your faculty/department like?

Alex, Economics, Jesus College, 1st year
Alex
Jesus College, 1st year
The Department

The faculty isn’t what one would describe as modern, more a 60s concrete block, but the lecture facilities are fit for purpose so they are more than adequate. The faculty library, the Marshall Library, is of a very good standard though with plenty of computers, work space and all of the books that you will ever need and more for the course.

What types of work do you have to do?

Sian, Economics, Queens College, 1st year
Sian
Queens College, 1st year
Types of work

We normally have between 2 and 3 supervisions a week which can be made up of question sheets or essay questions. Question sheets can normally be answered using lecture notes and the core reading from the lectures and can contain a variety of short and long questions. Essays tend to have a much longer reading list with the majority of texts being accessible online and if they're not online the college library or the Marshall Library (economics faculty library) will have copies.

Do you have career plans?

Alex, Economics, Jesus College, 1st year
Alex
Jesus College, 1st year

Whilst I have no specific career plans currently, economics at Cambridge opens so many doors. A degree in Economics from Cambridge will help to make you stand out from the crowd. For example one of my friends is going to work for the Bank of England once he graduates and another for an investment bank in the City.

What about your course would you change?

Sian, Economics, Queens College, 1st year
Sian
Queens College, 1st year

Less time spent on economic history and more time spent on quantitative methods in economics.

Typical timetable of a 1st year Economics student

Alex, Economics, Jesus College, 1st year
Alex
Jesus College, 1st year

The typical morning is lectures - normally about three hours a day. There are usually fewer lectures in the second term than the first and almost none in the third term! After lectures I would do my supervision work which may be problem sheets for macro, micro and maths or reading for and writing an essay in history or politics. Whilst the work can be challenging, there is always time to get it done and do extra things such as sports. There are normally five supervisions every two weeks.

- Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
9am - Micro - - -
10am Macro Micro Economic History Micro -
11am Economic History - Macro Politics -
12am Statistics Maths Economic History - -
1pm - - - - -
2pm Supervision - - - -
3pm - - - - -
4pm - - Supervision - -

What has been going on at Economics?

- Recent Events -

Marshall Society Ball

The Marshall Society also regularly hosts events for all members. Before Christmas they held their annual ball in which we were treated to an evening of fine dining

‘Paper 0’ Lectures

The Cambridge Society for Economic Pluralism holds lectures for ‘Paper 0’ to broaden your understanding. Recently they held a lecture on rethinking the role of the financial sector in economic growth.

German Ambassador talk

The Marshall Society, Cambridge’s Economic Society, holds talks by prestiged figures. Recently they invited the German Ambassador to the UK to talk about his views on the UK and Europe.

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